Drinking City Water

"I don't like to drink the City's water."
"I haven't tasted it in a long time, but...."
"The water tastes metallic"
"The water smells terrible!!"
"The water looks brown when I fill the bathtub."
"I remember one summer we were told not to drink the water, it had bacteria in it."
"I get my water from a spring at the side of the road. "
"I buy water at the grocery store, it's not that expensive"

OK, OK, OK. We've all heard it -- the City's water has gotten a bad rap over the years. Before the water treatment plant became operational in 1993 the water DID have a funny smell (kind of like an old fish bowl?) and an unpleasant brown color. That smell and color are being filtered out, now you will see beautiful clear water with no more fishy smell.
The metallic taste people used to notice was copper. The water used to be very acidic and corrosive to the copper water pipes in homes. As the water passed through the pipes, it dissolved the copper, hence the taste (and sometimes a pretty aqua blue color on the white fixtures -- that was copper, too). Because the filtration system also removes bacteria, we haven't had any bacteria in the distribution system since the Plant became operational, there's been no need to boil the water before drinking.
GIVE IT ANOTHER CHANCE ! THE CITY'S WATER QUALITY HAS IMPROVED DRASTICALLY DUE TO THE WATER TREATMENT PLANT -- IT'S WORTH TRYING AGAIN! PUT SOME IN A JUG IN THE REFRIGERATOR, AND TRY IT --YOU MIGHT BE PLEASANTLY SURPRISED.
FACT: We perform more than 70 bacteria tests each month, at more than 30 sites around the City to assure the consumer that the water is safe to drink. At least annually we test a whole list of other contaminants in each of the water sources, to make sure that no pollutants are present.
FACT: The water you collect on the side of the road is not considered a public water supply, and therefore, no one is required to monitor its quality. It might look clear, but you can't see the most harmful pollutants that could be present.
FACT: The City's water costs the homeowner less than 1/3 of a cent per gallon. A gallon of "spring water" from the grocery store may run 50 cents or more. (And, it isn't necessarily from a spring, it might even be from another public water supply)
FACT: The spring water you buy at a grocery store does not have to be tested as frequently as your public water supply. Regulations have not been very strict for bottled water, for its testing or its sources.

Whats in my water?